Root Vegetable Soup (A Guide To)

Root Vegetable Soup || An easy to follow recipe guide on how to make an amazing soup with any root vegetables. Use any of the following: potatoes, parsnips, carrots, celeriac, rutabaga, turnips, sweet potatoes or squash. Cozy and perfect for Fall or Winter. Very healthy, great for a detox. Dairy free, gluten free, plant based, vegan. || creamandhoney.ca
Root Vegetable Soup || An easy to follow recipe guide on how to make an amazing soup with any root vegetables. Use any of the following: potatoes, parsnips, carrots, celeriac, rutabaga, turnips, sweet potatoes or squash. Cozy and perfect for Fall or Winter. Very healthy, great for a detox. Dairy free, gluten free, plant based, vegan. || creamandhoney.ca

Hi. I've been gone awhile and I've missed you. It was nothing you did, I promise. I went on vacation to Mexico where I spent my 33rd birthday and it was exactly what I needed. I stepped off my hamster wheel of spinning thoughts and routines and settled into daily nothingness with loose plans of what food to eat and which beach to go to. I took the time I needed to breathe and be in my body and sigh out loud while watching the waves roll in and out. I did nothing and everything. I asked myself what truly feels good for me lately. What makes me feel inspired? What feels stuck? How can I move forward while keeping aligned and not overwhelmed?

I debated if I want to continue creating this blog. I love it and it's been one of the best learning experiences about myself and my capabilities, but I was feeling unsure if this is still where I want to be putting my free time and energy. It can feel lonely and disconnected writing into an abyss of space that hangs in the air and on screens. It's easy to fall into a comparison trap on social media where you're left feeling like you don't have enough or you're not where you want to be while seeing your dream life lived by other people. These incomplete feelings aren't real though, they're made up by my mind. By all of our minds. I recently had someone send me a message on Instagram that said, “do you do food blogging full-time? Because your life looks like a dream". This astounded me and I actually laughed out loud at how anyone could think that was my life. The funniest part was I felt the exact same way about her– that she had a dreamy life I coveted. I realized I assume that about a lot of people online. I find there's not a ton of transparency with online presences on how they got to where they are. I always read  interviews that mention “a lot of hard work" and  “I kept believing in myself". Although I'm sure these are true, the rest of us want to know how. Like actually how– the details, the steps, the mistakes, the times you were about to give up, what made you keep going. I want to hear about the human stuff, the relatable stuff. A lot of hard work and believing in myself are sentences I've heard my entire life and aren't new information. Without the details, it feels like there are secrets to success that no one is revealing. And guys, I love secrets. And I love details. Or maybe these details are so irrelevant to successful people because they've already made it and don't need that information anymore. Who knows? Do you? If you do– tell me?

I've been craving doing creative things with my hands and less online.  I wish the days were longer so I could experience and create more. My serving job is essential right now to pay my bills but it takes a lot out of me. It's a much faster pace than I prefer to live my life at. And this life really is short– I can feel it in the quickness of the days, the anxious feeling that comes with dusk, the moments I wake unexpectedly at 5 am and debate getting up to see the sun rise but then tell myself “another day" and fall back asleep. How can I create a life with more time and slowness? I'm forever working on it. I'd love to hear your suggestions. 

A friend and I read tarot card last night. Mine urged to me continue moving forward with current projects and that was the small sway I needed to rededicate myself to working in this space. My goal is to maintain the blog and make time for other creative activities that give me a sense of relief and disconnection from my day-to-day. For me, this will mean less scrolling social media, less tv, and more action-to-begin rather than procrastination. I am excited about this renewed feeling and sense of self. It will be a loving self that moves slowly even when there's a lot going on. I've also been re-evaluating this blog in terms of what I can offer you. I want to hear you, to help you, to know what you like or find interesting. What are your favourite parts about these posts? What do you want more of? Comment or send me a message and let me know, I would love to produce more content you want to see. That's where this soup comes in. I posed these questions to a friend. She said she loves when I make recipes approachable and the tips, tricks and whys on making food.

I wanted to create a guide where you can learn to follow your cooking intuition and create a soup out of almost any vegetables you have laying around. Soups are easy, they don't take a lot of effort and are  nourishing and delicious. One of the skills that is the most valuable in cooking is to understand the basics of a recipe so you can create one your own. I have a recipe at the bottom which you can follow directly, but this post is to act as a manual to help you feel confident in your technique and the steps of making a soup.

Root Vegetable Soup || An easy to follow recipe guide on how to make an amazing soup with any root vegetables. Use any of the following: potatoes, parsnips, carrots, celeriac, rutabaga, turnips, sweet potatoes or squash. Cozy and perfect for Fall or Winter. Very healthy, great for a detox. Dairy free, gluten free, plant based, vegan. || creamandhoney.ca

After basking in sunlight and sea for ten days, it can feel pretty miserable returning to feet of snow and -20 °C weather. Some things that help me are:

  • making hot and nutritious food and drinks like this soup
  • practicing self care (yoga, a good skin care routine, home spa nights)
  • the strikingly beautiful winter sunsets

Because the air is less hazy and more crisp and clear in cold weather, it creates brightly coloured skies upon sunrise and sunset. Every night brings fiery oranges and reds, cotton candy pinks and blues, or a rainbow gradient as the sun dips below the horizon. Our world is what we focus on. Right now, I choose beauty and slowness to centre my attention on. 

Ontario Place. Sunset in Toronto over Lake Ontario.
Toronto sunset
Root Vegetable Soup || An easy to follow recipe guide on how to make an amazing soup with any root vegetables. Use any of the following: potatoes, parsnips, carrots, celeriac, rutabaga, turnips, sweet potatoes or squash. Cozy and perfect for Fall or Winter. Very healthy, great for a detox. Dairy free, gluten free, plant based, vegan. || creamandhoney.ca
Root Vegetable Soup || An easy to follow recipe guide on how to make an amazing soup with any root vegetables. Use any of the following: potatoes, parsnips, carrots, celeriac, rutabaga, turnips, sweet potatoes or squash. Cozy and perfect for Fall or Winter. Very healthy, great for a detox. Dairy free, gluten free, plant based, vegan. || creamandhoney.ca
Root Vegetable Soup || An easy to follow recipe guide on how to make an amazing soup with any root vegetables. Use any of the following: potatoes, parsnips, carrots, celeriac, rutabaga, turnips, sweet potatoes or squash. Cozy and perfect for Fall or Winter. Very healthy, great for a detox. Dairy free, gluten free, plant based, vegan. || creamandhoney.ca

Vegetables                                                                                   

What kinds? Almost any vegetable will work for a soup! Make sure to pick vegetables you enjoy. For extra easiness and minimal thought, use vegetables that are all similar in physical structure (eg. all root vegetables, broccoli + cauliflower, etc). If you want to blend an array of vegetables with structural ranges, stagger your cooking times. Firm vegetables all go in together and any type of green (kale, collard greens, spinach) are added at the end with 5 minutes or less left on cooking time.      

Consider balancing flavours with vegetables (eg. don't use all bitter vegetables like turnip, kale, cabbage, brussel sprouts etc). Use a few but balance them out with a sweet vegetable (sweet potato) or neutral vegetable (cauliflower, potato).

Tip: You can balance extra bitterness with a creamy component like yogurt, cheese, cream, or coconut milk. Or a salty component like bacon. You can balance stinky notes from cabbage with some lemon juice and/or white beans.

Broth                                                                                  

Use whatever broth you like! For pureed vegetable soups I prefer organic chicken or vegetable broth. If you have a limited amount of broth on hand, make up the rest of the liquid with water (plus extra salt). I do this all the time if I'm missing a cup or two of broth and it still always tastes amazing but you must remember the extra salt or it may end up a bit flat or bland since the salty umami flavour is a major component of broth flavour. I salt to taste. To do this, taste the broth on its own. Now add the water and taste again. It will taste flatter and watered down. Now add a good pinch of kosher salt, mix and taste. Continue adding a little more and tasting each time until it tastes like full flavour broth again but not “salty". 

Aromatics   

This is the first (and most important flavouring step) of the soup. Cooking aromatics in some fat to begin a soup is very important. It releases flavours and is the main component of what will give your soup depth and deep delicious flavours. To begin, heat your heavy bottomed soup pot on medium-high. Add a tablespoon of preferred fat. How to know when your pan is hot enough: add a single drop of water after your fat and if it sizzles, your pan is ready for the aromatics. Add onion and a pinch of salt. Stir often while they cook until translucent. Add other aromatics once the onions are cooked.

Try: fresh ginger, herbs (dried or fresh), spices, chilis, curry paste and garlic.

Tip: Garlic burns easily so add it last of all aromatics and reduce your temperature while constantly stirring for a minute or two before moving on to the next step.

Fats

Olive oil, coconut oil, butter, ghee, avocado oil, animal fat, etc. 

Deglaze

Deglazing the bottom of a pot is important to scrape all those flavourful brown bits off the bottom. By adding a splash of white wine or vinegar, it creates immediate steam that releases these bits and adds a hint of acid to help balance the base of the soup. You can substitute with a splash a broth to do the same thing if you don't have wine or vinegar.

Building the Soup

Add all your vegetables (except greens) and broth to a large pot. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Leave the lid off while you let your soup simmer for 30 minutes of so. Leaving the lid off lets steam release which allows the liquid to cook down and concentrates the flavours. I taste the soup after 15 minutes or so and add more salt if needed. I find by 30 minutes the flavours are well developed but you can leave it for longer if you want it more concentrated in flavour, just keep in mind that it will yield less soup since the liquid decreases with the lid off. 

Pureeing

Once you are happy with the flavour, ladle the soup in to a blender and puree until smooth (or use a hand blender). Sometimes I serve it right away after blending. You can also pour it back into the pot and cook over low for 5 to 10 minutes to develop more flavours. Add a bit of acidity if it tastes too rich– a splash of white wine vinegar or a good squeeze of lemon will add a brightness to the soup without making it taste too acidic. Start with a little bit, it goes a long way. You can also add a creamy element at this point if you like (coconut milk or cream). If you do, keep the temperature on low to mix the creamy component so it does not curdle. 

Toppings

 For me, a pureed soup needs a topping. It feels more complete and adds texture. I use a few things of whatever I have on hand.

Try:  fresh herbs, toasted nuts or seeds, croutons, crushed Mary's crackers, parsnip (or other vegetable) crisps, herb oil, sliced green onions, roasted vegetables, roasted chickpeas, poached egg, sausage, bacon, cheddar cheese.

Root Vegetable Soup || An easy to follow recipe guide on how to make an amazing soup with any root vegetables. Use any of the following: potatoes, parsnips, carrots, celeriac, rutabaga, turnips, sweet potatoes or squash. Cozy and perfect for Fall or Winter. Very healthy, great for a detox. Dairy free, gluten free, plant based, vegan. || creamandhoney.ca
Root Vegetable Soup || An easy to follow recipe guide on how to make an amazing soup with any root vegetables. Use any of the following: potatoes, parsnips, carrots, celeriac, rutabaga, turnips, sweet potatoes or squash. Cozy and perfect for Fall or Winter. Very healthy, great for a detox. Dairy free, gluten free, plant based, vegan. || creamandhoney.ca
Winter sunset on the Lakeshore, Toronto.

Let's all do things that make us feel good, okay? 

Love,

 Megan

xx


ROOT VEGETABLE SOUP WITH PARSNIP CRISPS

the magic

inspiration:                cold winter days and nights

the feels:                    warm, creamy, smooth, earthy

eat with:                     crusty bread, Mary's crackers, fresh herbs,                                        herb oil, poached egg, sliced sausage,                                                bacon, grated cheese, ground meat. 

might like if you're into:       cozy cottages, self care, detoxing,                                                      food in bowls, historical fiction                                                        books or tv, cellars, log cabins, one                                                  pot meals, watching the fire. 

 

the science

makes 8 cups of soup (4 to 6 servings) || time: 45 minutes

ingredients:

  • 8 cups of peeled and chopped root vegetables                                                                                                (this particular soup contained the following)
    • 3 parsnips (for soup) + 1 for crisps
    • 3 carrots
    • 2 yellow potatoes
    • 1 turnip
    • 1 celeriac 
  • 5 cups vegetable broth (or chicken)
  • 1 onion, peeled and diced
  • 1 inch fresh ginger, peeled + grated
  • 4 cloves garlic, pressed or diced
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons coconut oil or extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ground pepper to taste
  • splash of white wine vinegar or white wine (for deglazing)
  • optional: squeeze of lemon for each bowl before serving to brighten
  • topping suggestions: parsnip crisps, fresh parsley, herb oil,  sliced green onions, crushed Mary's Crackers, croutons, toasted nuts or seeds, roasted vegetables, roasted chickpeas, poached egg, sausage, bacon, cheddar cheese.

method:                                                                                            

soup

  1. Heat large pot over medium-high heat. Add a tablespoon of oil. Once hot, add onion and a pinch of salt. Sauté until translucent (5 to 8 minutes). Add any other aromatics you are using (this recipe is ginger) and cook for another 2 minutes. Add garlic (and another tablespoon of oil if needed) and sauté for one more minute. The bottom of your pot may be brownish and a bit sticky. Pour a splash of white wine vinegar and scrape the bottom with a wooden spoon or spatula. Add herbs (thyme and rosemary) and mix.  
  2. Add root vegetables and stir to coat. Pour in broth and turn to high heat. Bring to a boil and reduce temperature to a simmer. Let simmer for 30 minutes uncovered. Taste and add up to a teaspoon of kosher salt. When using vegetable broth I usually prefer the whole teaspoon. Chicken broth may need less. If your broth tastes slightly bland, it needs salt.
  3. Ladle soup into blender and puree until smooth. Pour back into pot and simmer for another 5 minutes or so and add anything else (more salt or ground pepper) you may like.
  4. Ladle into bowls. Add any toppings you like and add a squeeze of lemon to brighten the soup.  

parsnip crisps

  1. Preheat oven to 400ºF. Line a baking sheet with tinfoil. Using a thin setting on a mandolin, shave a pre-peeled parsnip into very thin slices. Lay on baking sheet and brush with extra virgin olive oil. Sprinkle with salt. Bake for 3 to 8 minutes depending on thickness (check them at three and then every minute following). Be careful not to burn them. Let cool. 

 

Pine Shortbread Cookies

Pine Shortbread Cookies || With only five ingredients, these classic shortbread biscuits with pine are a perfect winter dessert or Christmas gift. Simple to make and can be frozen for a snack when guests drop by over the holidays. || creamandhoney.ca
Black Pine Needles || Pine Shortbread Cookies || With only five ingredients, these classic shortbread biscuits with pine are a perfect winter dessert or Christmas gift. Simple to make and can be frozen for a snack when guests drop by over the holidays. || creamandhoney.ca

Happy Holidays!!! Am I allowed to say that yet? Okay, happy pre-holidays! Is that better? I don't want to be like Wal-Mart playing Christmas music way to early and everyone's like, “It's only November, give it a rest!". But I will say that I'm getting excited for the holidays and for the soon-to-be posts I'm dreaming up. I'm teaming up with the amazing and talented Olaiya from Milly's Kitchen to bring you all a Wacky-Holiday-Fun-Time-Blog-Party-Extravaganza!!!! With balloons! Okay, not with balloons. Or half those words. But we are doing weekly posts leading up to Christmas that are going to be awesome! Olaiya has also got these hazelnut amaretti cookies for you right now over on her blog and let me tell you, they are looking delicious and divine and perfect for the Wacky-Holiday-Fun-Time-Blog-Party-Extravaganza. They keep well, they're easy to make and will impress any guests or loved ones you gift them to. I'm bringing you these festive and aptly seasonal cookies made with pine. Like pine needles straight from the tree. I baked 25 cookies and my partner and I ate them unreasonably fast. In 48 hours which equals six cookies each a day. Is that too many? I think it might be. These cookies make for a perfect gift because of the following reasons:

  1. They're cookies. Duh.
  2. They're easy to make.
  3. They freeze well. Actually I prefer them directly from the freezer, they taste extra decadent. 
  4.  People will be all, “oooo pine?! How rustic and seasonal." and you'll be like, “pine is the new chocolate chip bitch.
  5. You can tell people they're foraged pine cookies. People love that shit, they eat it up. But make sure you're clear that the pine is foraged and not the cookies, like you “foraged" them from the dumpster behind Wal-Mart. (Wow, Wal-Mart's getting a lot of exposure on here today. They should pay me. This is not an ad for Wal-Mart, I don't even shop there. Unless there's a really good deal on something which there always definitely is so then I do.)
  6. You can decorate your cookie tin or box with a sprig of pine to match– tie it on with some twine like all the Pinterest guys and gals do. But yours will be foreshadowing what's to come! Make it a guessing game. They get three guesses and if they're wrong, you get to keep the cookies. “Really Susan, you guessed wreath before pine needle cookies? I guess not everyone is cut out for guessing games. Maybe stick to rock-paper-scissors next time." Jk don't say that, Susan is a nice lady!

A note on foraging evergreens. Foraging pine is best in the Spring when the pine needles are young and flavourful. Summer and Fall are okay as well, but I find pine and spruce trees tend to lose their flavour once winter hits. Use the most fragrant needles you can find of a pine or spruce tree. If you cannot access a nice smelling pine, you can substitute fresh rosemary which has similar clean minty notes.

Do not forage from the tree below. It is a Yew tree and is poisonous. They are usually shorter, more bush like trees and sprout these hallow red berries that definitely look poisonous. All pine, spruce, fir and cedar trees are okay for consumption. Ponderosa pine should be avoided when pregnant. Balsam Fir needles can look similar to yew needles. The difference is Fir needles (and Hemlock) have two white strips on the bottom and Yew needles will be green on both sides. 

Yew Tree || creamandhoney.ca
High Park in Fall , Toronto || Pine Shortbread Cookies || With only five ingredients, these classic shortbread biscuits with pine are a perfect winter dessert or Christmas gift. Simple to make and can be frozen for a snack when guests drop by over the holidays. || creamandhoney.ca
Pine Shortbread Cookies || With only five ingredients, these classic shortbread biscuits with pine are a perfect winter dessert or Christmas gift. Simple to make and can be frozen for a snack when guests drop by over the holidays. || creamandhoney.ca

I'm also going to be giving tips each week on how to have and enjoy your holiday parties. Because there's nothing worse than having a party but not being able to enjoy it. Maybe you overextended yourself or invited certain family members out of obligation. And now all the punch is gone and Uncle Al's wearing your sheepskin rug as a kilt while gyrating his hips to Santa Baby. (There may be no way around this one, Uncle Al is a force of nature). 

Working in hospitality has made me very... what's the word? Hospitable. It can make some people bitter and complainy because serving all kinds of humans isn't an easy job but it is always a surprise. You never know if someone will leave a big tip and make your day or sexually harass you. It's a trip guys! I basically host a party every shift– the mood has to be right, your rapport with guests is key and the food should be delicious. You must also be able to read people's minds or you will get a bad Yelp review but not see it coming because when you asked them “How is everything?" and they said “Everything is great!", you believed that everything was great. Surprise! They hated it all. I don't want your party to get a bad Yelp review. So I'm here to help you avoid uncomfortable situations and give you suggestions on how to create an awesome stress free party and how to attend one and be a good guest. 

Holiday Party Tips (section one)

 

Planning The Party

Planning the party is half the excitement. You get to imagine how much fun it will be, dream up a menu and place bets on who will get the drunkest and who will make out with whom. While planning, we must ask ourselves some pertinent questions that will affect the party like:

What time of day will the party start?

3 pm for old people, 5 pm for families with kids, 6:30 to 8 pm for adults, 12 am for guests from Spain. 

What type of party will this be?

Is it a holiday brunch? Sit down dinner? cocktails and finger foods? Raging kegger?

Who will you invite? 

A guest list is important to get clear on. This will set the tone of the party. You don't want grandpa mixing up his Lipitor with Jake's MDMA so maybe stay away from an all-in-one-party if this is the case. You can always have two parties! If you are hosting elderly people, they tend to like magnums of cheap table wine (they always mention how good the value is). Also make sure to turn the music way down, that's the first thing elderly people ask at a restaurant. So turn it down. Then turn it down some more because it's still too loud. What? You can't tell if it's on anymore? Yep, that's the sweet spot. If you are hosting a larger party with lots of drinkers, this means you'll need to prepare by purchasing lots of booze or making it BYOB. You may consider having a designated puke area (my suggestion is an outside bush so there's no clean up after!).

Before planning the menu, do any of your guests have dietary restrictions?

Be extra careful of peanut allergies (possible death), deadly nightshade (certain death) and dairy allergies. These people poop a lot and it's embarrassing for them and unpleasant for your post-party clean up. How people get poop on the toilet seat will forever be an enigma to me. Do they stand to poop? Or do they have a vendetta and this is their passive aggressive way of telling me? (If you've pooped on a toilet seat, please send me an anonymous email telling me why and I'll be forever grateful. Namaste.)

How much time do you have to prepare for the party?

Think about how much you can get done in the days before the party. Consider what you'll need to do in the hours leading up to the party– final food preparations, cleaning your home and getting ready before guests arrive. I find things take longer than you think, so try and do as much as possible in the days before.

Where will the party take place?

Outside if you live in a warm climate? In the dining room and kitchen? How about the living room? If you live in a 500 sq ft apartment like me, this is all one space so problem solved! You probably don't want the party in the bedroom unless you live in a studio or you're having a swingers party, but a bedroom can make for a good coat room so you don't crowd your guests. (Again unless it's a swingers party, then you want to crowd your guests). Is it on a yacht because you're rich? (but you still plan your own parties and read blogs so you feel connected with the common people.)

Will you be putting up decorations?

What kind of decorations if so? Classy silver or gold and green? A miniature Christmas town with a train running through it? That toy reindeer that poops candies? A santa face toilet seat cover and rug set?

What will you use for serving?

Your regular dishes? The fancy china? Paper/plastic for less clean up? 

What day and time will it be?

When inviting people make it clear and concise with the date, location (apartment or buzzer number if applicable), time the party starts and time the food will be served. There's always that person who consistently shows two hours late so make sure it's clear when you're eating so you don't feel obligated to wait for them.

Eg.

Christmas party at my place on December 23rd!                                                                                                          Arrive at 6:00 pm for cocktails, dinner will be served at 7:30 pm.                                                                          Please RSVP by this Friday.                                                                                                                                          Address: 123 Pie Lane, apt #3.14. Buzzer #666. Secret password is “kosher dill".

If in question, state whether children are welcome. Or, if there will be complementary coke lines laid out on the table (the latter is likely an 80s themed Christmas party).

Pine Shortbread Cookies || With only five ingredients, these classic shortbread biscuits with pine are a perfect winter dessert or Christmas gift. Simple to make and can be frozen for a snack when guests drop by over the holidays. || creamandhoney.ca
High Park in Fall, Toronto || Pine Shortbread Cookies || With only five ingredients, these classic shortbread biscuits with pine are a perfect winter dessert or Christmas gift. Simple to make and can be frozen for a snack when guests drop by over the holidays. || creamandhoney.ca
Conifer/ Evergreen Foraging || Pine Shortbread Cookies || With only five ingredients, these classic shortbread biscuits with pine are a perfect winter dessert or Christmas gift. Simple to make and can be frozen for a snack when guests drop by over the holidays. || creamandhoney.ca
High Park in Fall, Toronto ||Pine Shortbread Cookies || With only five ingredients, these classic shortbread biscuits with pine are a perfect winter dessert or Christmas gift. Simple to make and can be frozen for a snack when guests drop by over the holidays. || creamandhoney.ca
High Park in Fall, Toronto || Pine Shortbread Cookies || With only five ingredients, these classic shortbread biscuits with pine are a perfect winter dessert or Christmas gift. Simple to make and can be frozen for a snack when guests drop by over the holidays. || creamandhoney.ca

Gifts

  • Make something! I love getting a homemade gift especially if it's food. A hand knitted scarf or  holiday wreath is also awesome. 
  • Cards. Make one! Or if you choose to buy a card, write something meaningful or more than “best wishes from stan". That feels like mediocre wishes to me, Stan. It only takes five minutes to write a few sentences and means more to people. 
  • Gift certificates. Great for Secret Santa gifts or if you don't know the person well. You could always make your own gift certificates for people you do know well like: babysit for an evening, take your car for a tune up, massage with (or without) happy ending, hide a dead body no questions asked (this is a good one because barely anybody redeems it. Do not give to someone in the mob or if they've ever mentioned their loan shark.)
  • Wrapping. You can put a gift in just about anything. Bags, boxes, wrapping paper, newspaper, butcher's paper, magazine pages, religious pamphlets, old underwear, etc. Decorate your gift with ribbons, bows, evergreen branches, sprigs of rosemary or thyme, bells, pinecones or holly.
  • For my gift this year, I would like this dad bod belly fanny pack so I can have more free hands at my next party. 
Black Pine Needles || Pine Shortbread Cookies || With only five ingredients, these classic shortbread biscuits with pine are a perfect winter dessert or Christmas gift. Simple to make and can be frozen for a snack when guests drop by over the holidays. || creamandhoney.ca

Happy party planning!

Meg                                                                                                                                                                                            xx


PINE SHORTBREAD COOKIES

the magic

inspiration:               Fall foraging

the feels:                   soft, crumbly, melty, creamy

eat with:                   milk, tea, coffee, other holiday cookies

might like if you're into:       forest walks, The Lion The Witch and                                                The Wardrobe, foraging, indigenous                                                  foods, parties.

the science

makes approximately 25 to 30 cookies depending on size || time: 1 hour 15 mins (prep, rest + baking)

ingredients:

  • 3.5 cups all purpose unbleached flour, sifted
  • 1 cup cane sugar
  • 1 + 1/4  teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped pine needles (can substitute fresh rosemary) 
  • 3/4 pound unsalted butter (3 sticks or 1.5 cups), at room temperature

method: 

  1. In large bowl (of stand mixer if you have one), add butter and sugar. With paddle attachment (or hand beater) mix until just combined. Add pine and salt and mix again until combined.
  2. Add sifted flour and beat on low until just combined and starts to come together. Dust a flat surface lightly with flour. Add dough to surface. Shape dough into two flat disks. Wrap in plastic and place in fridge for 30 minutes.
  3. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Line baking sheet with parchment paper. 
  4. Place one disk of dough onto lightly floured flat surface. Roll out dough evenly to 1/2 inch think. Cut out cookies with cookie cutter (mine were 3 inch circles). Reform extra dough together, roll out and cut more. Place onto baking sheet (I did 12 cookies per sheet). Place plastic wrap on top and return to fridge. Repeat with second dough disk. Place both baking sheets of cookies in the oven. Bake for 20 - 35 minutes (if baking one sheet at a time, 20 minutes may be enough. If baking both, you may need up to 35 minutes). Check at 20 and go from there. Bake to desired colour, some people love an all white shortbread, I like a hint of golden brown on the edges. Let fully cool. 

Keep in a sealed container on the counter, in the fridge or in the freezer (my favourite). Shortbread are SO good straight from the freezer, I highly recommend trying them frozen if you haven't. 

Adapted from Ina Garten's shortbread recipe.

 

 

TURMERIC DAHL + CAULIFLOWER BOWL

Turmeric Dahl + Cauliflower Bowl || A vegan detox bowl recipe that takes less than 30 minutes! It's easy, delicious and healthy! A perfect cozy bowl for fall or winter. Plant based, dairy free, + gluten free. || creamandhoney.ca

Turmeric continues to have its grand love affair in the food world. I've been very enthusiastic about it; the vibrant colour, health benefits and taste– warming and slightly pungent but in an unassuming way. Turmeric is like some of my favourite kinds of people– modest but vivacious all at once.            My favourite ways to enjoy turmeric include, but are not limited to:  

  •  In coconut or olive oil while frying eggs (turns them a pretty yellow colour)
  • On top of popcorn with coconut oil, sea salt + nutritional yeast                     
  • In smoothies, juices, kombucha                                                                                                            
  • In legume or grain-based bowls like rice, quinoa or lentils                                                        
  • Golden milk (the best winter pre-sleep drink)                                                                                                                            

It was a rainy day with howling winds while I cooked this dish and took photos. I had on the new Childish Gambino album (Awaken, My Love), a funky and soulfully introspective record. This dreamy yet contemplative setting gave way to a wandering mind and the food began taking on human characteristics through my camera lens. Behind her leafy appendage, the cauliflower appeared to shield her face and shy away from the camera. Hypnotized by her gentle cruciferous soul, I could feel all the conflicting thoughts of her beauty and roughness, her appropriateness or lack there of, her implied place in the world vs where she feels drawn to, her fixed reality vs lofty dreams, her innocence vs sexuality, her deepest fears and desires– that at some point have been mine and every other woman's. Then I was like, Whoa. This is just a cauliflower. Chill." Either way, I took care to remove her leaves with tenderness, aware I might be leaving her vulnerable and exposed. Just in case. 

It's a strange time right now in the world but I think it's bringing like-minded people and women closer together. Women have been distanced for far too long– pitted against each other, programmed to mutually judge and compare ourselves to one another.

Enough of that trash.

It feels terrible and makes us weaker individually and as a whole. It tells others and men that it's what what we expect and that we are okay with it. Let's all support and be there for one another in this weird and contrasting life, okay? It's grounding and unifying to know others are there for you. I used to have this irrational fear that would give me severe anxiety attacks while alone and out in public. My fear was that something would happen to me unexpectedly like a seizure or heart attack and no one would help me. I imagined they would all just stand watching me die and do nothing. I don't know where it came from but I had no faith in humans as a whole and wouldn't happen when I was in the company of people who were undoubtedly there for me. I don't have this this fear anymore, in fact I mostly feel the opposite. Mostly. Recently I have confusing and conflicting thoughts with everything happening in America, but then I shut that shit down because it makes me feel weak and powerless. And we cannot evolve or move forward if we all start feeling weak and powerless. We need to strive for more connectedness than ever right now.  Practicing gratitude and appreciating others has probably been the biggest factor in making my life a better and more joyful place. Why stop now that there are things happening I don't agree with? There have always and will always be things happening I don't agree with. I don't know what to do with the shit storm of information that is America right now, but I do know that can't let it suck me into a downward spiral of hate and disappointment about the world. I am trying to find a place of just being while I figure out.

Right now we need some comfort. We need some nourishment. We need to feel like everything is going to be okay. I find that simple comforts are the easiest things for me to be grateful for– my warm bed, loving friends and family, a bowl of pasta or cup of tea. This meal is just that. It's comfort, it's about feeling gratitude for everyday things. A bowl of hug if you will. 

Cauliflower || Turmeric Dahl + Cauliflower Bowl || A vegan detox bowl recipe that takes less than 30 minutes! It's easy, delicious and healthy! A perfect cozy bowl for fall or winter. Plant based, dairy free, + gluten free. || creamandhoney.ca
Cauliflower || Turmeric Dahl + Cauliflower Bowl || A vegan detox bowl recipe that takes less than 30 minutes! It's easy, delicious and healthy! A perfect cozy bowl for fall or winter. Plant based, dairy free, + gluten free. || creamandhoney.ca
Turmeric || Turmeric Dahl + Cauliflower Bowl || A vegan detox bowl recipe that takes less than 30 minutes! It's easy, delicious and healthy! A perfect cozy bowl for fall or winter. Plant based, dairy free, + gluten free. || creamandhoney.ca
Cauliflower || Turmeric Dahl + Cauliflower Bowl || A vegan detox bowl recipe that takes less than 30 minutes! It's easy, delicious and healthy! A perfect cozy bowl for fall or winter. Plant based, dairy free, + gluten free. || creamandhoney.ca

I've made this dish at least once a week for the last month. It's so tasty, very quick to make and really versatile. You can use whatever vegetable(s) you have in your fridge and each time I top it with something slightly different– almonds, sunflower seeds, pepitas, a fried egg, soft boiled egg, whatever herbs I have, dulse flakes, or hot sauces of all kinds. Enjoy with some lemon-mint water or switchel for an extra detox feel. 

Enjoy! xx

Turmeric Dahl + Cauliflower Bowl || A vegan detox bowl recipe that takes less than 30 minutes! It's easy, delicious and healthy! A perfect cozy bowl for fall or winter. Plant based, dairy free, + gluten free. || creamandhoney.ca
Dried Red Lentils || Turmeric Dahl + Cauliflower Bowl || A vegan detox bowl recipe that takes less than 30 minutes! It's easy, delicious and healthy! A perfect cozy bowl for fall or winter. Plant based, dairy free, + gluten free. || creamandhoney.ca
Lemon-Mint Water || Turmeric Dahl + Cauliflower Bowl || A vegan detox bowl recipe that takes less than 30 minutes! It's easy, delicious and healthy! A perfect cozy bowl for fall or winter. Plant based, dairy free, + gluten free. || creamandhoney.ca
Turmeric Dahl + Cauliflower Bowl || Turmeric Dahl + Cauliflower Bowl || A vegan detox bowl recipe that takes less than 30 minutes! It's easy, delicious and healthy! A perfect cozy bowl for fall or winter. Plant based, dairy free, + gluten free. || creamandhoney.ca
Turmeric Dahl + Cauliflower Bowl || Turmeric Dahl + Cauliflower Bowl || A vegan detox bowl recipe that takes less than 30 minutes! It's easy, delicious and healthy! A perfect cozy bowl for fall or winter. Plant based, dairy free, + gluten free. || creamandhoney.ca

TUMERIC DAHL + CAULIFLOWER BOWL

the magic 

inspiration:                   cozy winter evenings

the feels:                       warm + hearty

eat with:                        flatbread, naan,lemon + mint water, ginger                                        hibiscus switchel, golden milk,                                                          poached/boiled/fried egg, green tea                                                  w/honey.

might like if you're into:        yoga, kitchari, congee, hand made                                                    quilts, eucalyptus steam rooms, detox                                                water. 

 

the science

makes 4 servings || time: 20 minutes

ingredients: 

  • 2 cups dried red lentils
  • 2 cups hot water
  • 2 inch piece ginger, peeled and grated
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 3/4 cup full fat coconut milk + extra for drizzling on top
  • 1/2 tsp garam masala
  • 1 head cauliflower, chopped into small florets
  • 1/4 cup sunflower seeds
  • 2 tbsp sesame seeds
  • 1 lemon or lime, cut into quarters
  • fresh ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup cilantro + 1/4 cup parsley, chopped for garnish
  • optional: chili flakes, a fried/poached/boiled egg

method: 

  1. Rinse lentils in cold water and strain. In medium pot heat the coconut oil, add onion, ginger, garlic and turmeric. Stir frequently and sauté for a couple minutes. Add hot water, salt and lentils to pot and bring to boil. Reduce to simmer stirring every few minutes until lentils appear thicker with no extra liquid (around 7-8 minutes), add coconut milk and garam masala. Cook for another 7-10 minutes or until the lentils look porridge-like or cooked to your preference. 
  2. While cooking the lentils, in a small pot add water and lightly salt. Bring to boil. Add cauliflower and boil for about 5 minutes (or until just cooked). Drain. 
  3. Spoon dahl into bowls, add cauliflower, a squeeze of lemon/lime and pour extra coconut milk over top. Sprinkle on chopped herbs,  sunflower + sesame seeds, black pepper, chili flakes + egg if desired. 

Dahl recipe adapted from Hello Glow.