How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls)

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca
How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca
How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Are you like, “wtf is onigiri?" or “that triangle looks complicated". If so, I'm here to tell you it's easier than it looks and everything will be okay. The best part about onigiri is that they are a humble food and a minimalist's dream. The result is a stomach full of rice and happiness. Those food emojis that once eluded you ( 🍙+ 🍘) are finally making sense now.

Onigiri are rice balls (or shapes) wrapped in nori and often stuffed with a filling. A comfort food made up of fun shapes and endless fillings– onigiri have the potential to steal your heart. Like all the fancy toasts nowadays, a blank canvas of rice invites almost any creation you can dream up. Maybe this is your first attempt making onigiri. If it is, I'm excited for you. I love first times because you never know what to expect and every step is an adventure and a learning process. Remember your first kiss? I do. Mine was wet and weird and his first kiss too. We were twelve and had just become official via awkward phone call on the kitchen landline. We met up with friends and were wandering the streets; we never had real destinations back then, we went anywhere and nowhere. We stopped beside a large subdivision mailbox and with our friends standing ten feet away “not watching us", we kissed. I had to crank my neck up facing the sky because he was tall and I could smell his breath, which wasn't bad but weird because I was rarely that close to someone. He didn't have a clue what to do, (I had practiced on a pillow so I knew a thing or two). My first kiss felt like something between CPR and a gaping fish mouth sucking up food from the top of the tank. It was methodical with tense tongue action and the entire time I attempted to adjust his robot-like motions with no success. He burped after, (not in a hot way), which didn't surprise me from the way he was sucking the air from lungs moments before. It was not at all what I expected and although I thought I was going to love it, I didn't. At first. I had to keep trying, maybe three or four times before kissing was fun, albeit not as good as my pillow boyfriend. Kissing is weird when you think about it. We put our germy wet mouths together and move them around. Sometimes it feels like I can almost inhale the other person's soul. Like I could pull it into mine through kiss and desire. I've always wanted to be inside someone else's soul and mine at once. Like a double soul! Would I feel twice as alive?!

My first time eating sushi wasn't great either. Yes, kissing and sushi can parallel each other. My mouth wasn't used to the textures and flavours and I had to get my mind around eating raw fish after growing up with a white North American diet. I kept trying sushi though, because there was something that appealed to me even though I couldn't eat more than a few bites. It took me five sushi outings before I began to crave it. Then I was hooked. And I loved knowing that you really can't judge a book by it's cover, or even it's first chapter. Life is funny and cliche that way. We are always changing and evolving into someone new but yet we are still the same, or appear to be. Your first onigiri may not be the prettiest but they'll get easier and better each time. Like kisses and raw fish.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca
How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca
How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Guide To Onigiri

 

Rice

To make onigiri you must use white Japanese sushi rice. Not brown, not jasmine, not wild rice. Sushi rice is the only way because of it's sticky consistency. Onigiri will fall apart with any other type. I use the brand in the above photo and you can purchase it at most Asian grocery stores. It is also very important to rinse the rise in cold water until the water run completely clear or your cooked rice consistency will be off. 

Seasoning The Rice

When the rice is still warm, add to a bowl, season with whatever you like and mix with a large spoon/ rice paddle or chopsticks until evenly combined.. Here are some ideas for seasonings. 

  • Furikake – Japanese seasoning usually made with bonito flakes (fish flakes), seaweed, sesame seeds. Can be found in Asian grocery stores. 
  • Sesame seeds – white or black, I prefer black to give colour contrast.
  • Herbs, fresh + finely chopped – cilantro, basil, mint, parsely, chives, green onions. Just remember to match your filling with your herb. (eg. mint would go well with a cucumber filling but probably not with salmon). 
  • Seaweed– soaked and finely chopped.
  • Kelp or dulse flakes
  • Yukari – Japanese seasoning made with shiso. 
  • Sakebushi – dried, fermented and smoked salmon flakes.
  • Sriracha + Tamari/ Bragg's aminos/ Soy sauce
  • Rice Vinegar
  • Sesame oil
  • Nuoc cham – A Vietnamese sauce that's sweet, fishy and tart. 
How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Fillings

Each onigiri only needs about one tablespoon of filling or it will seep out of the middle when you mold it. Be as creative as you like, onigiri are very versatile. Just consider your seasoning, filling and dipping flavours when you dream up your onigiri. You can use almost anything for a filling, especially if you want to use up little bits of leftovers in your fridge (eg. chicken, roasted vegetables etc). Here are some ideas for fillings.

  • Tuna or salmon, canned – w/ mayo (or Kewpie mayo from Japan), a dijon little mustard/ wasabi, salt + pepper.
  • Umeboshi – pickled salted plums, a traditional onigiri filling. Remember to remove the pit. 
  • Avocado – mashed or finely chopped w/ a pinch of salt and squeeze of lemon/lime
  • Radish – fresh or pickled. You can use this recipe for quick pickled onions to do an easy and fast pickle of any vegetable you prefer. 
  • Black garlic – It tastes like something between a sweet beet and roasted garlic. It's my new obsession (nice on fried rice as well) and can be found at most Asian grocery stores.
  • Cucumber – finely chopped. Add a little sesame oil, chili flakes and rice vinegar if you like. 
  • Mushrooms – sauted or pickled, finely chopped. 
  • Cooked fish/meat – finely chopped
  • Kimchi
  • Pickled ginger
  • Shrimp – finely chopped 
  • Egg – scrambled or boiled + chopped
  • Bacon – finely chopped

Flavour Combinations + Pairings

Here are some ideas for matching flavours within your seasoning, filling and dip (if desired).

  • Vietnamese –         seasoning: cilantro/basil/mint (or combine any together)                                                                                     filling: cucumber or cooked shrimp                                                                                                                             dip: nuoc cham sauce or peanut sauce
  • Japanese –                seasoning: furikake                                                                                                                                                       filling: tuna w/ mayo, rice vinegar + salt                                                                                                                  dip: tamari w/ a bit of wasabi.
  • Korean –                  seasoning: black sesame seeds                                                                                                                                    filling: kimchi                                                                                                                                                                   dip: Bibimbap/ Gochujang sauce.
  • Breakfast –              seasoning: bacon (finely chopped)                                                                                                                             filling: scrambled egg or mashed sweet potato                                                                                                         dip: smashed avocado/ guacamole or sriracha mayo.
  • Mediterranean –   seasoning: sundried tomatoes + fresh basil (finely chopped)                                                                                 filling: goat cheese                                                                                                                                                           dip: lemon tahini sauce
How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Wet hands.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Rub with kosher salt + rub.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Take a palmful of rice + make into a ball.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Press a hole with thumb.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Add a tablespoon of filling.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Fold over like a book.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Form into desired shape.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Triangle, sphere or cylinder.

onigiri-17.jpgHow To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

For more guidance, click here for triangle shaping video.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Cut nori sheets into shapes.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Fold around onigiri.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Wet edges of nori to seal on to each other.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Cut strips for smaller nori.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Fold on to onigiri.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Dip in sauce.

How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca
How To Make Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls) || These delicious and simple snacks are easy to make and fun to shape and decorate. Made with sushi rice and filled with many different toppings like cucumber, avocado, tuna, + umeboshi (pickled plum). gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, plant based. || creamandhoney.ca

Bite.                                                                                    Chew.                                                                                 Enjoy.


HOW TO MAKE ONIGIRI (JAPANESE RICE BALLS)

the magic

inspiration:            Asian snack food    

the feels:                warm, soft, comforting

eat with:                 green tea, tamari, sriracha, seaweed salad, green                                leaf salad, sake,homemade dipping sauce                                            (below)

might like if you're into:      Japanese cuisine, rice bowls, sushi,                                                   healthy snacks, comfort food, vessels                                                 for dipping sauces, geometric shapes,                                                 Hi-Chew candy (grape is my                                                             favourite), Pocky sticks.

 

the science

makes 6 to 10 onigiri, depending on size || time: 30 to 45 minutes

ingredients:

onigiri

  • 1 cup sushi rice
  • 1 + 1/4 cup water
  • nori sheets for wrapping rice balls
  • bowl of water for hands (or run hands under water at the sink after each onigiri)
  • kosher salt for hand after the water
  • filling for rice balls (cucumber, avocado, pickled radish, tuna, umeboshi). Approximately one tablespoon per onigiri shape.
  • optional: few tablespoons of seasoning for the rice balls (sesame seeds, furikake, kelp flakes etc)

dipping sauce

  • 1.5 tablespoons tamari/ Bragg's liquid aminos (soy free)/ soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/2 - 1 teaspoon sambal olek chili paste or sriracha
  • 3 tablespoons water (or less if desired)
  • optional: 1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger

method:

  1. Rinse the rice thoroughly until the water runs clear. 
  2. Cook rice based on your favourite method (mine is always via rice cooker). One cup of sushi rice yields about three cups of rice. Make sure not to cook the rice too far in advance because it is best molded and served when warm.
  3. While rice is cooking, prepare you filling(s). Chop fillings like cucumber or radish finely. Anything that's not already a paste like consistency like tuna or mashed avocado. 
  4. Once rice is cooked, season it with whatever you like since onigiri is predominantly rice so it's important to add some extra flavour to the base of rice unless you're feeling classic plain rice. My favourites to add are furikake, black sesame seeds, or fresh herbs. Scroll up for the section on more seasoning options. Add seasoning to rice and mix with chopsticks or large wooden spoon. Add more if desired and mix again. 
  5. Wet hands with water. Add a sprinkle of kosher salt to hands and rub together for a second to distribute evenly. Grab a palmful of rice and shape into a round ball. Press thumb into the middle to create an indent about a tablespoon in size. Fill with whatever filling you desire, be careful not to overfill the hole or it will be hard to shape the onigiri and the filling will squeeze out. Fold the sides in on each other like you're closing a book. The easiest way to learn the shaping technique is to look at the hand shapes I use in the photos above or use this video to get the hang of it. It's pretty simple once you get the feel of it. Repeat with the rest of the rice.
  6. Once all onigiri are shaped, cut or rip your nori into desired shapes. You can use a whole sheet to wrap your shapes or cut thin strips. When sticking to onigiri, wet the spots you want to stick together and they will adhere to each other. Serve on their own or with sriracha or whisk up the dipping sauce ingredients for my favourite addition.

BISCUITS FROM SCRATCH: A BRUNCH SPREAD

    

Spread them with butter, jams or jellies, slather them in gravy, or create a sandwich for any time of day. Savoury or sweet, biscuits are always there for you. Simple ingredients but also lovely and versatile foods—butter, flour, salt, milk or cream, and baking powder. A kind of perfection and calm in this chaotic world.

I decided on  Martha Stewart’s recipe for Baking Powder Biscuits. Why? Because it's Martha. Self made, household name, icon, lawbreaker, ex-model, ex-stockbroker, jack of all trades and entrepreneur - Martha. I recently found out that it wasn’t until her 30s when Martha became a self taught gourmet cook through the use of Julia Child’s “Mastering The Art of French Cooking”. (Side note on Julia—I can't help but mention that at 37 she enrolls at Le Cordon Bleu in a foreign country, among mostly men and becomes a culinary icon. Hence, total badass.) Back to Martha — she starts a catering business in her late 30s and that’s where her current career stemmed from. As a 30 year old woman, I love this. I spent my 20s mostly confused and floundering around trying to find something that I was “supposed to do with my life”. Stories like Martha and Julia's remind me that all is okay in the world. That I've got lots of time. That doing things which thrill me and slow down time into fragments of beautiful moments are what I want to repeat. Those moments that seem to linger in a suspended state of focus and ease with no background noise. Sometimes they're seconds, sometimes minutes. We need more of those... Enter biscuit making.

Why These Biscuits?

1. Because they’re delicious and I love to eat them. Duh. 

How I picture myself eating biscuits: Biting elegantly into delicate flakiness while using a tea saucer to catch my crumbs. I slowly savour every bite alternating with a sip of tea, whilst sitting in peaceful meditation gazing out a sunlit window. Birds are chirping softly in the background.

How I actually eat biscuits: Remove biscuits from oven. Tell myself I’ll wait until they cool. One minute later I tell myself it’s been 10 minutes. I quickly devour the biscuit barely swallowing one bite before taking the next. My mouth is burnt (a chronic problem in my life) because apparently I have no patience or self control. A few crumbs hit the plate while most are falling onto the table and floor. I am cookie monster in human female form. I proceed to eat 1 or 2 more, quickly stuffing myself and then immediately swearing off biscuits for the rest of the day—crumbs falling out of my mouth as I shake my finger to no one in the empty room, like that will make it official. I abandon that resolution a few hours later and have another, thinking back wondering how I could ever deny myself something so beautiful. 

2. Because these are made with cream and delicious when topped with honey. Hence, “Cream + Honey”. Clearly, it was meant to be for my first post. (Also, I’m sorry these are not buttermilk biscuits for the people who are adamant that biscuits should be made with buttermilk. Forgive me—I promise they are still delicious. Amen.

3. Because who doesn’t love fresh warm biscuits?! I dare you to find one person. Just the words “homemade biscuits” make me imagine tenderly wrapping them up in a blanket and dancing about while singing to the birds and squirrels around me. (I like imagining I live in a magical forest. I actually live in a city so it’s probably just the garbage outside that attracts  the animals. And by birds and squirrels I meant raccoons and rats. They need love too people!)

4. Because Martha is the f*#$ing s*&t! 

5. Because you can literally put anything on them. Like anything! Well, not poison. But that’s pretty much it. Unless you're one of those people who can do crazy tricks and eat anything like light bulbs or poison. (note: I do not condone eating light bulbs or poison.)

Okay, now for the biscuits!

Biscuits From Scratch || Cream + Honey
Biscuits From Scratch || Cream + Honey

The pre-oven mess I call "art".

Biscuits From Scratch || Cream + Honey

Ta da! Magic! (or as some people call it, "science".)

Biscuits From Scratch || Cream + Honey
You can even make little baby biscuits!!! (Everything in mini form is exciting)   

(top to bottom: lemon curd, honey, Seville orange jam, maple butter, butter, blackcurrent jam)

You can even make little baby biscuits!!! (Everything in mini form is exciting)

Biscuits From Scratch || Cream + Honey

Brunch isn't really brunch until bacon and/or eggs are on the table.  

Biscuits From Scratch || Cream + Honey
Biscuits From Scratch || Cream + Honey

The perfect brunch to me is a balance of savoury and sweet—it's like having two meals in one. I'm insatiable like that.

Welcome the Brunch Biscuit:

Maple drizzled bacon, egg, old cheddar, thyme butter and sriracha sauce (insert 100 happy emoji faces here). 

Biscuits From Scratch || Cream + Honey

Eat it as slow or fast as you like. Moaning during is encouraged, it makes it better, trust me.

   Take a nap.    

Bask in what you've just created and consumed. Commit to eating a green vegetable later. 

Take a nap.


B I S C U I T S

t h e   m a g i c 

i n s p i r a t i o n :        brunch + the south

f e e l s :                          comforting, homey, indulging

e a t   w i t h :                tea, coffee, butter (obviously), herb butter (fancy!), honey, cinnamon,                                                                  maple butter, maple syrup, jams/jellies, lemon curd, whipped cream                                                                    + strawberries, gravy!!!, baked beans, breakfast things (bacon, sausage, ham,                                                    eggs, cheese, mushrooms, tomato, avocado), potato leek soup.

m i g h t   l i k e   i f   y o u ' r e   i n t o :    comfort food, southern hospitality, all things that                                                                                                      include butter, blaring music and singing your heart                                                                                                  out, a thin layer of flour dust on everything you own.

t h e   s c i e n c e

Martha Stewart's Baking Powder Biscuits from "Martha Stewart's Baking Handbook"                                                   

makes 1 dozen medium-sized biscuits

i n g r e d i e n t s :

  • 4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • 2 tbsp baking powder
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 sticks (1 cup) unsalted butter, cold, cut into small pieces
  • 2 cups heavy cream, plus extra for brushing

m e t h o d :

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Add all dry ingredients into a large mixing bowl. Whisk together. 
  3. Cut in cold butter pieces with a pastry blender (or 2 butter knives). Continue until the pieces of butter range in size with none larger than the size of a pea. 
  4. Add cream and fold into the dough with a spatula. Continue folding until the dough just comes together. It should be slightly sticky and scraggy. 
  5. Place the dough onto lightly floured surface. With gentle hands, pat the dough into a round approximately 1 inch thick incorporating any loose pieces. 
  6. Take a floured round biscuit cutter of your choice, cut out the biscuits and place onto baking sheet. ***
  7. Place all the biscuits in the middle with edges touching each other.
  8. Brush top of biscuits with cream.
  9. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until the biscuits are golden (rotate halfway through time). 
  10. Place biscuits on wire rack to cool.  

*Tips for better biscuit making: Just a few things I've learned that seem to make the most difference in flakiness, rise and overall beauty of biscuits.

  • Cold ingredients are key. Of course the butter but I've made my best biscuits by putting my whisked dry ingredients in the fridge for 30 minutes before. By using a pastry blender or knives you can keep the ingredients from taking on as little warmth as possible. I really love getting my hands dirty but my biscuits apparently don't feel the same. If your dough feels a bit warm after working it on the counter you can always put it in the fridge for a bit to cool down and firm up the butter again. 
  • Work the dough as little as possible when patting it out. The gluten becomes activated and therefore your biscuits become chewier and not as flaky. 
  • *** When using a biscuit cutter, do not twist it after you push down. It feels like the natural thing to do to remove the biscuit from the dough but this will shrink and close the layers (lines on the sides of the cooked biscuits that make it look and feel super flaky) . So just push the cutter down then release up instead of twisting. It makes a world of difference.
  • If you prefer fluffier biscuits— keep them together touching on the baking sheet when cooking. 
  • If you prefer crunchier biscuits on the outside - place them away from each other, not touching.