BLUEBERRY LEMON MINT SODA

Blueberry Lemon Mint Soda || Refreshing summer mocktail recipe made with blueberries, lemon juice, honey, sparkling water + fresh mint. No refined sugars and tastes amazing as a gin or vodka cocktail. || creamandhoney.ca

In support of summer weather I bring you this cooling drink so you can settle into the deep heat. Let if flow over you; welcome it because it won't stay forever and you'll be craving it soon. Sip cold drinks, point fans at your barely clothed body and avoid turning on your oven. This is how I live in hot summer months. 

Pros of Hot Weather

  • No need for a sauna, you live in one
  • A multitude of cold drinks all day long
  • Swimming feels exceptional and necessary
  • Being lazy and not feeling bad about it 
  • Patio drinks
  • Rose wine (or frose)
  • Hair on head grows faster

Cons of Hot Weather

  • Hair on body grows faster
  • Bugs everywhere
  • Hot garbage smell (in the city)
  • Hot manure smell (in the country)
  • Under boob sweat
  • Back sweat pooling in butt crack
  • Chub rub– the struggle is real my fellow thick thigh ladies (and men).
  • It's so hot your drink sweats and slips out of your hand and spills all over your new summer dress. But at least you're cooled off so maybe it's a pro?

I've been obsessed with blueberries lately (see my blueberry tarragon gravlax). They are a classic Canadian summer food and I feel the need to devour them in pies, smoothies, jams, muffins or all on their own. They awaken memories of wandering through forests, swimming in lakes and the sound of cicadas on hot days. 

Blueberry Lemon Mint Soda || Refreshing summer mocktail recipe made with blueberries, lemon juice, honey, sparkling water + fresh mint. No refined sugars and tastes amazing as a gin or vodka cocktail. || creamandhoney.ca
yellow water lily + my bff Alex

yellow water lily + my bff Alex

I just returned from a camping trip with two of my favourite people and we had the most amazing time. We canoed down a river filled with lilies and lily pads, saw blue herons up close, bought doughnut and watermelon floaties and swam in the waves of Lake Huron, made delicious camp food, played cards, sipped on these wine-ciders (half cider + half pinot noir = the perfect cooler), listened to baby wolves howling at night and relaxed into our naturey surroundings. It reminded me how peaceful and calming my mind can be and how connected I feel in the outdoors. It reminded me I live in an outrageously beautiful country with a rich history of people who lived off this land and respected it to the highest degree. It reminded me of the beauty all over the world and how much I still want to see and experience. As much as I tend to dislike winters in Canada (which feel never ending), the summers are so gorgeous that it might make up for it. No Canadian has ever uttered the words “Winters go by so fast!". If they do they're lying and are probably trying to get you to visit when it's cold and dark and all they'll want to do is cuddle and eat bread. Don't. Do. It.

But do come in the summer. It is breathtaking. 

white water lily

white water lily

Lake Huron at Pinery Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada

Lake Huron at Pinery Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada

Blueberry Lemon Mint Soda || Refreshing summer mocktail recipe made with blueberries, lemon juice, honey, sparkling water + fresh mint. No refined sugars and tastes amazing as a gin or vodka cocktail. || creamandhoney.ca
Blueberry Lemon Mint Soda || Refreshing summer mocktail recipe made with blueberries, lemon juice, honey, sparkling water + fresh mint. No refined sugars and tastes amazing as a gin or vodka cocktail. || creamandhoney.ca
Blueberry Lemon Mint Soda || Refreshing summer mocktail recipe made with blueberries, lemon juice, honey, sparkling water + fresh mint. No refined sugars and tastes amazing as a gin or vodka cocktail. || creamandhoney.ca

Let's talk simple syrup for a hot minute. I want to show you how to make your own easily and with more exciting things than white sugar. This recipe calls for a honey simple syrup. Don't worry, it takes no time and you'll have a new skill to impress people with. 

Standard simple syrup recipes are a 1:1 ratio of sugar/sweetener to water. If you prefer a thinner less sweet syrup, add a bit more water than sugar. If you prefer a thicker sweeter syrup, add more sugar than water. “Rich syrup" is a 2:1 ratio of sugar to water. Usually simple syrup is made by adding water and sugar/sweetener of choice to a small pot and heating to just before a boil until fully dissolved. But there is no need to turn on the stove on a hot day. Below I have included the lazy person's way which is how I usually make drink syrups of all kinds. 

Make simple syrups out of any of the following for subtle but different flavours:

  • Demerara or turbinado syrup– for a deeper more caramel-like flavour. Good for tropical drinks/ rum drinks.
  • Honey syrup– you can use any type of honey you like. Good for iced black/green tea, drinks with jasmine, gin, lemon, or bourbon. 
  • Agave syrup– the lighter in colour the agave is, the more it will taste like classic simple syrup. The darker in colour the more rich the flavour will be, closer to honey. Good for margaritas (lighter agave), tequila or mezcal cocktails, drinks with lime or watermelon.
  • Coconut sugar or brown sugar syrup– for a deeper, more molasses-like flavour. Good for winter cocktails, old fashioneds, bourbon based cocktails. 
  • Maple syrup– use real maple syrup always. Good for old fashioneds, bourbon based cocktails, ciders, mulled wine, dark or light rum, any warm winter flavours like allspice, cinnamon or clove. 

One Minute Honey Simple Syrup Recipe

  • Boil water in your kettle. Add equal parts of honey and boiled water to a container with a tight sealable lid. Shake vigorously for 10 seconds or until completely dissolved. Keep in fridge for up to one month. Make as much or as little as you like. 
Blueberry Lemon Mint Soda || Refreshing summer mocktail recipe made with blueberries, lemon juice, honey, sparkling water + fresh mint. No refined sugars and tastes amazing as a gin or vodka cocktail. || creamandhoney.ca

BLUEBERRY LEMON MINT SODA

the magic

inspiration:                         hot summer days in Canada

the feels:                             sweet, tart, fresh, effervescent

eat with:                              barbecued fish, blueberry tarragon                                                    gravlax, a splash of gin, watermelon                                                  feta salad

might like if you're into:      Foraging, fruit galettes, pine forests,                                                canoeing, The Great Lakes, the sound of                                            cicadas, daddy long legs, wading in                                                  rivers

 

the science

ingredients:

                                                                                                                                                                                       blueberry preserves

  • 1 cup blueberries (frozen)
  • 2 tablespoons coconut sugar
  • 4 - 6 tablespoons water
  • 1/2 lemon zested

blueberry lemon soda (one serving)

  • 1.5 ounces (3 tablespoons) blueberry preserves
  • 1/2 ounce lemon juice
  • 1/4 ounce honey simple syrup (see above for easy one minute recipe)
  • 4 mint leaves
  • sparkling water
  • mint sprig or lemon wheel for garnish

method:

                                                                                                                                                                                          blueberry preserves 

  1. Add blueberries, sugar, lemon zest and 4 tablespoons of water to small pot. Stir and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer blueberries for 10 to 15 minutes. Add 1 to 2 more tablespoons of water if thick. The final consistency should be more like blueberry syrup, not thick like jam. Let cool, pour into mason jar  and seal. Keep in fridge for up to one week or in the freezer for up to two months. 

blueberry lemon soda

  1. In a cocktail shaker (or mason jar), add blueberry preserves, lemon juice, honey simple syrup, and mint leaves. Fill shaker or jar 3/4 full with ice, seal and shake for 10 seconds. Fill short rocks glass with ice, open cocktail shaker and strain (with cocktail strainer or hand held strainer) over rocks glass. Top with sparkling water, stir gently and garnish with mint sprig or sliced lemon wheel. If using a bigger/taller glass or making two, double the ratios in the recipe. 

 

BLUEBERRY TARRAGON GRAVLAX

Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca
Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca
Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca

Greetings lovely humans. I've made a purple fish for you because dining on purple and blue foods feels rich and elegant but simultaneously childlike, reminding me of sour blue gum balls and grape jello. It sits between the balance of classy and unrefined and as a person I too reside within that spectrum, sometimes closer to one side or another depending on the day. 

Me: “Am I classy?"                                                                                                                                                             Friend: “Hmmmm. I would say that you always treat people with class."                                                               Me: “Sooooo I'm not classy."                                                                                                                                         Friend: “Well you're not–not classy. It's a good thing. You're very down to earth."                                                   Me: “Yeah, that's good. I still want to be classy though. I think I just trip and fall too much. Classy people are never clumsy. That's what's holding me back. Right?!"                                                                                           Friend: “I think you're great the way you are."   (translation: you are not classy, nor will you ever be. It's okay though.)

This friend is a very classy human which is why she'd never agree with any perceived negative qualities such as my clumsiness. She never talks about poop or periods or burps loud and she always wears lipstick two shades off her lip colour so it looks natural yet polished. I've never been that kind of person, I don't think I was born to be. As a kid I won a milk chugging contest, learned how to burp really loud on purpose and arm wrestled all the boys in my grade beating every single one (because none of them had gone through puberty yet and I was strong from carrying my baby brother and sister around). As a teenager I was always in fiery debates about sexuality, race, women, religion, anything that stirred people up. I was a crusader! Really I just couldn't keep my mouth shut and was trying to figure out the world which seemed cruel and unfair– your typical teenage angst. As an adult I have gained a some classiness. Or maybe peacefulness is more accurate. I focus on accepting what is, not fighting it. I hone my skills on creating a better and more joyful life. And I never chug milk anymore. But I do burp loudly when alone or around people who know me very well. It's part of my charm? In a world so full of social media and it's contrived artificiality I aim to allow my flaws, to be uncovered and exposed. To be me in whatever state of myself is coming forward that day. And to always hold the most compassion for myself and others.

I've been contemplating the thought of becoming the person you dream to be– because maybe that person is who you really are. It's how we move forward and know what steps to take next, to come closer to our truer selves. So who exactly is that person? What do they think about? What do they do in their free time? What kinds of people do they surround themselves with? What do they talk about? What do they wear? What do they eat? How do they feel about themselves and others? How do they love and appreciate themselves and others? I did a journal entry about this person and it has really stuck with me. In the biggest way around how this future me treats herself– without disapproval or being hard on herself. Without investing time or energy into what others think. And always with love and understanding. I encourage you to ask yourself these questions and see what comes up. See what you can change today to become a little more of that person because they are ultimately who you really are. Personality is a bunch of characteristics we have constructed ourselves and we can choose differently if we want. We can't control what happens to us, but we can control how we react and the thoughts we focus on. It just takes some conscious awareness, compassion and desire to move forward into the unknown. These are some things to contemplate over a plate of purple blueberry fish. Sometimes things don't sound like they work... until they do. 

Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca
Lemon zest || Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca
Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca
Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca
Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca
Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca

My aunt Margaret always has the loveliest stories from travelling the world. One of my favourites is her recollection of Swedish Christmas. She told me people get together and go from house to house snacking on smorgasbords and having a drink at each one enjoying each other's company. Everyone has preserves, cured meats, pickled herring, gravlax, rye breads, meatballs, potatoes and glogg for all the indulge in. Apparently you must eat the julbord in certain stages– fish first, cold meats second, warm food third and then of course dessert. Don't even think about taking a meatball before you've had your gravlax. How rude! Doesn't that make you feel all warm and cozy inside? It is very hygge (to know more about hygge click here).

Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca

For these quick + easy pickled onions go here!

Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca

To make your own Montreal bagels click here!

Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca
Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca
Blueberry Tarragon Gravlax || Easy curing recipe for salmon that is delicious and a rich shade of purple. Gravlax (lox or cured salmon) is perfect with bagels, rye bread, cream cheese, fresh vegetables, crackers, herbs, pickled things and capers! || creamandhoney.ca

This is a very simple recipe and the preparation time is only fifteen minutes. A few ingredients, a blender, a fridge and voila! Purple brunch–lunch! Just make sure you plan accordingly since it takes 48 hours to cure in the fridge. This recipe is inspired by beet cured salmon which turns the exterior a rich red adding a hint of sweetness and subtle flavour. One of my favourite spots to eat in Toronto is Karelia Kitchen, a Nordic smokehouse and cafe where there are smorgasbords filled with fish, cured meats, breads, crackers, pickled things, and preserves. A little of everything to stimulate the mind and senses.

Now get out all your tiny bowls and mix and match to your heart's desire to create a different tasting bite every time. 

xx


BLUEBERRY TARRAGON GRAVLAX

the magic

inspiration:                      Karelia Kitchen in Toronto

the feels:                          elegant, salty, sweet, chewy, soft

eat with:                           smorgasbords, champagne, vodka,                                                     aquavit, rye or pumpernickel bread,                                                   bagels, crackers, pickles of all kinds,                                                 cheese (cream, goat, ricotta, brie), creme                                           fraiche, capers, lemon, vegetables                                                     (cucumber, avocado, tomato, onions,                                                 radish, sprouts), herbs, caviar, honey,                                               horseradish, mustard, potatoes

might like if you're into:      cold weather countries, Jewish delis,                                                  Swedish Christmas, rolling rivers,                                                    catching crayfish, wild berry picking. 

the science

makes 4 to 6 servings || prep time: 15 mins curing time: 24 to 48 hours

ingredients:

  • 1 fillet of fresh salmon 
  • 1 cup sea salt 
  • 1 cup brown sugar 
  • 1/4 cup fresh tarragon
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
  • 2 cups frozen blueberries, thawed

method:

  1. Add all ingredients except the salmon to a blender or food processor. Blend until evenly combined. 
  2. Foil a baking dish just big enough for the fish and have to foil come up the sides. Pour in half the curing mixture. Add the piece of salmon and cover with the other half of curing mix. Cover the top with saran wrap tightly. Cover a couple bricks or heavy books with foil and set them on top of the fish. Put the dish in the fridge with weighted items.
  3. Keep in the fridge for 24 to 48 hours, turning the fish every 8 to 12 hours. The fish will be fairly firm when ready. 
  4. Remove it from the dish when ready and gently rinse the cure off under cold water. Slice gravlax into pieces and serve with bread, crackers and accompaniments. Wrap tightly in saran wrap and it will keep for a few days in the fridge. You can freeze if you aren't going to eat it within a few days but it is always best eaten fresh as freezing will change the texture.

Recipe adapted from Copper River Red Salmon, Blueberry Gravlax.

Everything Bagel recipe + adjustments I used can be found through my last post.

Make your own Quick Pickled Onions ready in 15 minutes.

BUMBLEBERRY PIE

Bumbleberry Pie || Three types of berry pie (raspberry, blackberry + blueberry). Homemade pie crust from scratch with an easy to make pie filling. A perfect summer pie for a picnic or potluck. || creamandhoney.ca

I always thought Bumbleberry was a made up fairy tale word, like jabberwock* or chortle** from Alice in Wonderland. If a pie was made in Wonderland it would likely be some sort of  Bumbleberry-Mome Rath-Jub Jub Bird flavour with LSD-like effects. (***Am I making sense right now?) To my surprise, I discovered that Bumbleberry is a real-world type of pie that is defined as having at least 3 kinds of berries". What a fabulous name! I will admit I was a bit let down from my previous parallel universe pie idea, but I will settle for a delicious mixed berry pie any day if that's my other option. Sigh. 

Tip: If you drink champagne during the making and eating of the pie, it becomes a little more magical. Drop a few extra berries in your glass and it's almost as if you're toasting the Queen of Hearts herself. But no one liked that bish anyways. The Cheshire Cat is the dude I would hang with. 

* Jabberwock: a large beast with the body and wings of a dragon, fish-like head, antennae and talons for hands. It also wears a vest. <3                                                                                                                                                              ** Chortle: to chuckle gleefully. A blend of chuckle and snort.                                                                                     *** Here is the poem Jabberwocky to understand but also become more confused at the same time. You're welcome.

Fresh berries || Bumbleberry Pie || Three types of berry pie (raspberry, blackberry + blueberry). Homemade pie crust from scratch with an easy to make pie filling. A perfect summer pie for a picnic or potluck. || creamandhoney.ca
Prosecco cocktail || Bumbleberry Pie || Three types of berry pie (raspberry, blackberry + blueberry). Homemade pie crust from scratch with an easy to make pie filling. A perfect summer pie for a picnic or potluck. || creamandhoney.ca
Wildflowers of Ontario || Bumbleberry Pie || Three types of berry pie (raspberry, blackberry + blueberry). Homemade pie crust from scratch with an easy to make pie filling. A perfect summer pie for a picnic or potluck. || creamandhoney.ca
Ontario woods || Bumbleberry Pie || Three types of berry pie (raspberry, blackberry + blueberry). Homemade pie crust from scratch with an easy to make pie filling. A perfect summer pie for a picnic or potluck. || creamandhoney.ca

Forests are my own version of Wonderland where you can find hidden wildflowers and berries that risk being either delicious or deadly. Get your thrills on.

Wildflowers || Bumbleberry Pie || Three types of berry pie (raspberry, blackberry + blueberry). Homemade pie crust from scratch with an easy to make pie filling. A perfect summer pie for a picnic or potluck. || creamandhoney.ca

The art of pie making from scratch is not the easiest task. I've been working on my crusts lately which resulted in a rollercoaster of emotions. I often end up with rough dough that breaks easily and won't roll out. People say, “Don’t use too much liquid” and “Barely work the dough or you will make it tough”. In turn, I end up with dough that doesn't come together because I'm so scared to over handle it. 

Directions from most recipes tend to be something like:

1. Mix dry ingredients together.

2. Add COLD butter. It must be COLD. Did I mention COLD?! Cold. The word has lost all meaning. 

3. Break butter into small pieces using that food processor you don't own.

4. Add liquid. But not too much. But not too little. But a little more than that. Nope, you added too much. You fail at pies.

5. Now bring dough together in a perfectly uniform disk by barely touching it. No hands at all in fact. Like, with your mind would be best.

7. Roll out your perfectly smooth pie dough to a impossibly thin diameter.

8. Now cut some things, twirl upside down, criss cross the lattice then send it down an elevator shaft and expecto patronum! You’ve made a beautiful and SUPER EASY pie!

My steps usually goes something like:

1. Mix dry ingredients together. NAILED IT. I'M DOING GREAT!                                                           *stop and dance to Grown Woman by Beyoncé*

2. Break apart the COLD butter with my fingers that don't work like anything like food processor blades. But would be cool if they did... Edward FoodProcessorHands?

3. Attempt to form it into a disc, but more closely resembles a pile of beige garbage. Swear a bunch.

4. Put in the the fridge, say a prayer and hope for a miracle.

5. Take the dough out. The prayer didn't work. I'm not religious so what did I expect. Debate going to church. Decide no, because all the church I've ever been to in life was really boring. Not like in Sister Act at all, which was disappointing as a young girl (wait for the beat to drop at 1:10!).

6. Cry. Accept I will never be a good pie maker. Curse more. Look up to the sky and loudly declare that “I didn't want to be a pie maker anyways!". 

7. Construct a very grim lattice which leaves the pie looking far too exposed. Wonder if the pie feels vulnerable right now... Bake the pie. Take a nap from the stress.

8. Eat the sad looking pie because any pie is acceptable when you're in need of comfort.  

I started going around to everyone I know saying, “What's with the expression, Easy As Pie?! It was clearly made up by someone who never made a pie in their life! Or they were a professional pie maker and never did anything else but make pies! Either way, it's bullshit.” I was so frustrated I googled the expression to see where it came from. Apparently the idiom is actually referring to the act of EATING pie because it is a simple and pleasurable experience". Uhhhh Yeah! Obviously eating pie is easy! Eating any type of delicious food is easy! You could just insert any food into that expression and it would work. Some things would make even more sense like, easy as wine". You can accidentally drink a bottle of wine to yourself, but you can't accidentally eat a whole pie in one sitting. It's not that easy.

Some other weird expressions that make no real sense to me…

And Bob’s your uncle!" – WHO IS BOB!? Apparently he’s everyone’s uncle. Probably everyone’s weird creepy uncle who is estranged because no one trusts him since the expression referring to him suggests that Bob being your uncle makes something really easy, but it's probably not. Bob is complicated. Like pie making. And reading that run-on sentence. I'm sorry.

They’ve got skeletons in the closet" – Newsflash: Dead bodies stink guys! They stink real bad. If anyone has a skeleton in their closet you’d be able to smell it from a mile away, there would be a million flies hanging around their home and it wouldn’t be a f@#king secret at all. People wouldn’t be coming over to their place for a cup a tea thinking “you know, that Susan is acting strange lately. And when did she get all those pet maggots? I think our Sue might be up to something...”.                 No. They would barf from the smell the minute Susan opened the door and be like, SUSAN WTF?!". I don’t know Susan, but she just seems like the type to store a dead body in her closet. 

Straight From The Horse’s Mouth – Uhhhhhh HORSES DON'T SPEAK!!! And when did they become such truth tellers anyways!? But if they did speak, they are probably the ones who made up all these nonsense expressions like Easy As Pie because they can't make pies, they just eat all the ones cooling on the window sills which is super easy and fun. 

Anyways, I figured out how to make better pie thanks to an amazing blog. Kristin from Pastry Affair is my fairy-pie-godmother. She explains here the method that makes me a delicious flaky crust which comes together easily. She gives details and photos of why it works and what it should look like every step along the way. Thank you Kristin! xx

*note: the ingredients for this buttermilk crust recipe are from Joy The Baker (who is the OG of bake blogs in my opinion), but using Pastry Affair's method is what made this pie come together for me. They are both amazing and you can check them out to make your life a better more buttery place. 

Bumbleberry Pie || Three types of berry pie (raspberry, blackberry + blueberry). Homemade pie crust from scratch with an easy to make pie filling. A perfect summer pie for a picnic or potluck. || creamandhoney.ca
Bumbleberry Pie || Three types of berry pie (raspberry, blackberry + blueberry). Homemade pie crust from scratch with an easy to make pie filling. A perfect summer pie for a picnic or potluck. || creamandhoney.ca

Fyi– this pie is more tart than sweet because that's how I like my pies, but feel free to add more sugar if you prefer the sweeter side of things. xx


BUMBLEBERRY PIE

t h e   m a g i c 

i n s p i r a t  i o n :                    berry season + desire to improve my crust-making skills 

f e e l s :                                        tart, sweet, flaky, lush

e a t   w i t h :                              iced mint tea, iced coffee, allonge, whipped cream, vanilla or almond                                                                  ice cream, mascarpone, champagne for elegance and magic

m i g h t   l i k e   i f   y o u ' r e   i n t o :             rivers and woodlands, deep rich hues, talking purple cats,                                                                                       cottages in the forest, window sills, wildflowers, stained                                                                                           fingers, foraging, 3.14159265...                                                                                      

t h e   s c i e n c e

makes one double crust or two single 9 inch crusts

i n g r e d i e n t s :

crust

  • 315 grams all purpose flour (2.5 cups) *I always weigh flour because it tends to weigh out far less than the cup value which affects the final product.
  • 2 sticks of unsalted butter (1 cup or 226 g)
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp pink or sea salt
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk

filling

  • 2 1/2 cups blueberries
  • 1 1/4 cup blackberries
  • 1 1/4 cup raspberries
  • 1/2 cup raw cane sugar
  • 1/4 cup cornstarch
  • juice from 1/2 lemon
  • zest from 1/2 lemon
  • 1 tsp real vanilla extract
  • 1/4 tsp pink or sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 egg, beaten with a tsp of water into it, (for brushing onto the crust before baking)
  • turbinado sugar, (for sprinkling onto the pie before baking)

 

m e t h o d :

crust 

With the ingredients above, use  Pastry Affair's step by step directions because they are incredibly thorough. Click here to learn this method! She ends with the dough pressed into the pie plate.

1. Place plastic wrap on top of the pressed  pie bottom and place into fridge to re-cool.  

2. If making a lattice, create whatever width you desire for the strips. I made 6 strips, 1.5" wide and keep them on parchment paper while cutting to prevent any sticking. Click here for a video to help you make a pie lattice. Move parchment paper with strips onto a baking sheet, place plastic wrap on top to cover the pie strips and place into fridge to re-cool.

3. Preheat oven to 375°F and make pie filling while it heats up. In a large bowl add all the berries, sugar, cornstarch, lemon juice, lemon zest, vanilla, salt, and cinnamon and mix together gently. Let macerate in the fridge for 15 minutes. 

5. Remove pie bottom from fridge and take off plastic wrap. Pour berry mixture into the pie bottom. Remove pie strips from the fridge and create your lattice on the top of the pie. Crimp sides with fingers or press with a fork to complete.

6. Using a pastry brush, glaze the top of the pie with the egg wash and sprinkle with turbinado sugar. Place pie into the oven on the middle rack and bake for 1 hour. 

7. Let pie cool for at least 45 minutes before eating. It feels terribly long but worth the wait so it doesn't spill out. Top with ice cream, whipped cream or pouring cream if desired.